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Transportation – Community Project Funding Request

Transit Infrastructure

Transit Infrastructure Projects are public transportation capital projects eligible under chapter 53 of title 49 of the United States Code. Eligible capital projects are described under section 5302(4) of title 49, United States Code. All projects must be:

  1. Transit capital projects or project-specific planning/design for a transit capital project;
  2. Supported by the state, local governmental authority, or Tribal government that would administer the project. Inclusion on a Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) or Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) would satisfy this requirement; and
  3. Sponsored by designated recipients, States (including territories and the District of Columbia), local governmental authorities, and/or Indian tribes.

Public transportation or transit is defined in section 5302(15) and (22) of title 49, United States Code, as regular, continuing shared-ride surface transportation that is open to the general public or open to a segment of the general public defined by age, disability, or low income, and does not include intercity passenger rail transportation, intercity bus service, charter bus service, school bus service, sightseeing service, courtesy shuttle service for patrons of one or more specific establishments, or intra-terminal or intra-facility shuttle services.

The Subcommittee will not fund activities that are administrative in nature even if they are eligible expenses under the statutory citation. These include but are not limited to general operating expenses, joint development projects, and planning activities authorized under sections 5303, 5304, and 5305 of title 49, United States Code.

Projects will be subject to various Federal requirements such as competition in contracting, Buy America, and the National Environmental Policy Act

The Subcommittee will continue to treat the Capital Investment Grants (CIG) program as programmatic requests and will not fund CIG projects under Transit Infrastructure Projects. Any projects for which the sponsor is seeking or will seek a CIG grant will not be considered.

Demonstration of community support for a project is crucial for determining whether it should receive funding. Projects must have substantial evidence of community support to be considered for funding. Community support documentation can include: letters from elected officials and community groups, local transportation or community development plans, publications (including news articles), and any other documents that demonstrate public support for the project.

Community Project Funding (CPF) Questions for Transit Infrastructure Projects:

  • Total project cost.
  • Does the project require an environmental review? If so, what is the status and/or outcome of the review under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)?
  • Does the project have other public (federal, state, local) and/or private funds committed to meet match or cost-share requirements for costs related to construction, operations, and maintenance? If yes, list sources and amounts of funds.
    • The cost-share requirements are defined in statute. In general, transit capital projects typically require 20 percent non-federal share.
  • If the project receives less than requested for the transit infrastructure projects, will the project proceed without waiting for additional funding sources?
  • Does the project intend to apply for any DOT discretionary programs before proceeding? If yes, will the project sponsor still proceed if not selected?
  • Provide a history of federal funding for the project, if any. Include formula funds and any discretionary grants.
  • Where is the project in the construction process?
  • Estimated start and completion dates.
  • Is the project on a state, tribal or territorial transportation improvement plan (STIP) or a transportation improvement plan (TIP) as of 12/31/2022? If yes, provide a link to the plan.
  • Provide the STIP or TIP ID Number and specify which plan the ID Number comes from.
    • Example: See below – The STIP or TIP also can be used for the location/description of a project, the total project cost, and information about where funding comes from.

Highway Infrastructure Projects

Highway Infrastructure Projects are capital projects eligible under title 23 of the United States Code. Eligible projects are described under Section 133(b) of title 23, United States Code, as amended by title III of division A of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. Tribal and territorial capital projects authorized under chapters 1 and 2 of title 23, United States Code, are also eligible.

All projects must be:

  1. Capital projects or project-specific design for a capital project.
  2. Supported by the state or Tribal government that would administer the project. Inclusion on a Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) or Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) would satisfy this requirement.
  3. Administered by public entities or Tribal entities.

The Subcommittee will not fund activities that are administrative in nature even if they are eligible expenses under the statutory citation. These include general operating expenses, and planning activities required under sections 134 and 135 of title 23, United States Code.

Applicants should be aware that Highway Infrastructure Projects have a non-Federal cost share calculated on a sliding scale. The cost-share requirements are defined in statute and vary based on activity, location, and other factors.

Please review the cost-share requirements HERE.

Projects will be subject to various Federal requirements such as competition in contracting, Buy America, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Committee strongly encourages Members’ offices and potential funding recipients to reach out to their state departments of transportation to determine the eligibility and viability of projects.

Demonstration of community support for a project is crucial for determining whether it should receive funding. Projects must have substantial evidence of community support to be considered for funding. Community support documentation can include: letters from elected officials and community groups, local transportation or community development plans, publications (including news articles), and any other documents demonstrating public support for the project.

Community Project Funding questions for Highway Infrastructure Projects:

  • Total project cost.
  • Type of project eligible under 23 USC 133(b) (Surface Transportation Block Grant Program); 23 USC 201 (Federal Lands and Tribal Transportation Programs); 23 USC 202 (Tribal Transportation Program); or 23 USC 165 (Territorial and Puerto Rico Highway Program).
  • Estimated start and completion dates.
    • Appropriated funds for these projects cannot be used for costs incurred prior to project authorization, which occurs when a project sponsor signs a grant agreement
  • Has the request been submitted to a federal agency for non-earmarked funds, or to another Subcommittee or Committee this fiscal year? If yes, which one(s)?
  • Please provide a history of federal funding for the project, if any. Include both formula funds and any discretionary grants.
  • Does the project have other public (state, local) and/or private funds committed to meet match or cost-share requirements for costs related to construction, operations, and maintenance? If so, what is the source and amount of those funds?
  • If the request does not fully fund the project, describe where the remaining funding comes from to complete the project.
  • Is the project on a STIP or a TIP? If yes, please provide a link to the plan.
  • Please provide the STIP or TIP ID Number and specify which plan the ID Number comes from.
    • Example below: The STIP or TIP also can be used for the location/description of a project, the total project cost, and information about where funding comes from.

Airport Improvement Program (AIP)

AIP Community Project Funding requests are intended to enhance airport safety, capacity, and security, and environmental concerns.

All projects must be:
• AIP eligible in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 47100 et seq., and FAA policy and guidance.
• Included in the FAA’s National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS).
• Supported broadly by local stakeholders, including residents, businesses, and elected officials.
• Administered by an airport and/or airport sponsor.

Federal Requirements:

Projects will be subject to various Federal requirements such as competition in contracting, Buy America, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The potential grantee should reach out to FAA Regional District Offices to ensure that projects will be in compliance with these mandates.

Cost Share:

For large and medium primary hub airports, the grant covers 75 percent of eligible costs (or 80 percent for noise program implementation). For small primary, reliever, and general aviation airports, the grant covers a range of 90-95 percent of eligible costs, based on statutory requirements. Specific cost share requirements should be understood by the grantee, and verified by the FAA Regional District Office, along with other requirements to receive FAA funding.

Demonstration of Community Support:

Demonstration of community support for a project is crucial for determining whether it should receive funding. Projects must have substantial evidence of community support to be considered for funding. Community support documentation can include: letters from elected officials and community groups, local transportation or community development plans, publications (including news articles), and any other documents that demonstrate public support for the project.

Community Project Funding questions for Airport Improvement Program (AIP)

  • Has the airport sponsor provided assurances that the project is eligible under AIP statutes? Airport sponsors should engage with their Federal Aviation Administration Airport District Offices to ensure eligibility under statutory requirements.
  • What are the benefits of this project and why is it a priority?
  • Estimated start and completion dates.
  • Does the project have other public (federal, state, local) and/or private funds for the required cost-share and committed for the forecasted operations and maintenance costs? What is the source and amount of those funds?
  • Has the airport submitted a grant application for this same project to FAA?

Port Infrastructure Development Program

Port Infrastructure Development Program projects are projects eligible under Section 54301 of title 46, United States Code, as amended by title XXXV of division C of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022.

The Subcommittee will only fund projects that meet eligibility criteria and will be administered by eligible applicants, as described by statute. As a reminder, funding may not be directed to forprofit recipients. Due to the limited amount of total CPF funding, priority will be given to projects at small inland river and coastal ports and terminals, as described in 46 U.S.C. 54301(b), and to discrete, smaller-scale projects at larger ports and intermodal connections to ports.

This program has a statutory non-Federal matching requirement, with potential exceptions for small and rural area ports. Applicants should review 46 USC sections 54301(a)(8) and 54301(b) for more information on these cost-share requirements before submitting requests for funding. Note that recipients are also required to comply with reviews and audits from the Department of Transportation.

Projects may be subject to various Federal requirements such as Buy America and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Committee strongly encourages Members’ offices and potential funding recipients to reach out to their local port authorities and the Maritime Administration’s Gateway Offices to help determine the eligibility and viability of projects.

Demonstration of community support for a project is crucial for determining whether it should receive funding. Projects must have substantial evidence of community support to be considered for funding. Community support documentation can include: letters from elected officials and community groups, local transportation or community development plans, publications (including news articles), and any other documents that demonstrate public support for the project.

Community Project Funding questions for Port Infrastructure Development Projects:

  • Total project cost.
  • Who is the recipient? Provide a website address if available.
  • Is the project at a small port, as described under 46 USC 54301(b)?
  • Is the project in a rural area, as described under 46 USC 54301(a)(12) – an area that is outside of a Census-designated urbanized area?
  • Estimated start and completion dates.
  • Has the request been submitted to a federal agency for non-earmarked funds, or to another Subcommittee or Committee this fiscal year? If yes, which one(s)?
  • Please provide a history of federal funding for the project, if any.
  • Does the project have other public (state, local) and/or private funds committed to meet match or cost-share requirements? If so, what is the source and amount of those funds?
  • If the request does not fully fund the project, describe where the remaining funding comes from to complete the project.

Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements (CRISI)

Rail infrastructure projects are capital projects eligible under the CRISI program authorized in section 22907 of title 49, United States Code. CRISI provides grants to assist in financing the cost of improving passenger and freight rail transportation systems.

All projects must be:

  • Rail capital projects or systems planning for a rail capital project;
  • Supported by the state, local governmental authority, or Tribal government that would administer the project; and
  • Sponsored by public entities or Tribal entities.

This is a new Community Project Funding account for Fiscal Year 2024. The Subcommittee will not fund activities that are administrative in nature even if they are eligible expenses under the statutory citation. These include but are not limited to general operating expenses, rail-related research, and workforce activities.

Demonstration of community support for a project is crucial for determining whether it should receive funding. Projects must have substantial evidence of community support to be considered for funding. Community support documentation can include: letters from elected officials and community groups, local transportation or community development plans, publications (including news articles), and any other documents that demonstrate public support for the project.

Community Project Funding (CPF) Questions for CRISI Projects:

  • Total project cost.
  • Does the project have other public (federal, state, local) and/or private funds committed to meet match or cost-share requirements for costs related to construction? if so, what is the source and amount of those funds?
    • The cost-share requirements are defined in statute. Rail capital projects under the CRISI program require a minimum 20 percent non-federal share.
  • If the project receives less than requested, will the project still proceed without waiting for additional funding sources?
  • Provide a history of federal funding for the project, if any. Include formula funds and any discretionary grants.
    • EXAMPLE: FY20 BUILD Discretionary Grant of $7.5 million.
  • Where is the project in the construction process?
  • Estimated start and completion dates.
  • Is the project on a state rail plan as of 12/31/2022? If yes, provide a link to the plan and specify page number.
  • Is the project included in a grade crossing action plan? If yes, provide a link to the plan and specify page number.

For questions, please contact Sayanna Molina at Sayanna.Molina@mail.house.gov